Renewable Energy

Immense Potential of Clean Energy

How we as a society generate and use energy is directly linked to greenhouse gas emissions and climate change.

Currently, most of our power comes from carbon dioxide-emitting fossil energy, and dangerous nuclear energy. The more rapidly we can transition to cleaner, safer, local renewable energy sources, the more rapidly we will make progress on reducing greenhouse gas emissions.

Solar power has been growing, but is nowhere near its capacity. At least 20 percent of our roofs should have solar panels. Wind power is a good option for some carefully selected locations. Sonoma County is blessed with the Geysers geothermal wells, which could produce a majority of our power. We could also be getting power from our waste stream. And we can do much more to modernize our buildings to use less power. Plus, the $225 million we pay every year for electricity currently is a drain on the local economy – it should be employing people and paying for energy projects right here in Sonoma County.

Sonoma Clean Power

SCP_altlayout1One of the top renewable energy priorities of the Climate Protection Campaign has been the creation of Sonoma Clean Power, a new power provider focusing on local renewable energy sources. The program has been established in Sonoma County and five of its cities and will launch in May 2014.

The Climate Protection Campaign invites you to join the growing conversation about local energy resource development enabled by Sonoma Clean Power. “Planning Concepts” describes our vision, approach, ideas, and several potential programs that Sonoma Clean Power might initiate to advance a local clean energy economy. It is a living document that we expect to revise over time. Our intent is to help develop and implement the best ideas so that Sonoma Clean Power fulfills the vision and inspires communities around the country. We hope you find “Planning Concepts” helpful as you consider your own energy needs and evaluate the many opportunities presented by Sonoma Clean Power. We welcome your comments, questions, and suggestions. SCP Local Resource Planning Concepts – Jan 17

CPC first identified community choice aggregation as a promising means for Sonoma County to rapidly reduce greenhouse gases in a CPC White Paper released in July of 2005.

 

Renewable Energy Secure Communities (RESCO)

Another top priority of the Climate Protection Campaign’s renewable energy program is the Renewable Energy Secure Communities research project. The RESCO program takes a very close look at energy use and renewable energy sources available in Sonoma County and analyzes them to determine how to optimize renewable energy deployment. Its purpose is to develop and demonstrate a model for locally owned, cost-effective renewable energy that helps us meet our greenhouse gas reduction goals. It is a multi-year (2009-2013), multi-partner program funded by the California Energy Commission. For more information visit Sonoma RESCO. Click on the “library” tab on the left for the reports. RESCO Task 5 Report contains the localized energy portfolios for Sonoma County.



Latest Updates

Take Action: Write the CPUC Opposing PG&E’s Proposal to Limit Favorable Solar Rates

SAMPLE LETTER We recommend sending this letter to all the commissioners at the CPUC and copying the governors office, if you have or are planning a solar installation.  Addresses and email addresses are below. February 2014 President Michael R. Peevey California Public Utilities Commi
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Congressman Huffman Says Congress Stymied on Climate

Congressman Jared Huffman spoke to the Business for Clean Energy Group meeting about climate and energy measures in Congress. The group of about 40 business leaders was hosted by Labcon, an international medical labware manufacturer located in Petaluma that has a large solar installat
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Sonoma Clean Power Authority Holds First Meeting

The Sonoma Clean Power Authority board met this Tuesday, making several decisions to advance the enterprise during its start-up phase. Windsor Council member Bruce Okrepkie was seated on the board, as Supervisor Susan Gorin came off. She now serves as  alternate. The Board approved th
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